Pew research interracial dating

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"It's important for children to see a reflection of themselves, to see the beauty in themselves and know they're not odd."Gregersen, who is black, and her husband, Erik, who is white, don't make a big deal out of living as a biracial couple in Elmhurst.

But they decided to transfer their daughter to a private school with a greater mix of black and white students.

made it possible for couples of different races and ethnicities to marry, such unions have increased fivefold among newlyweds, according to a new report.

In 2015, 17 percent, or one in six newlyweds, had a spouse of a different race or ethnicity compared with only 3 percent in 1967, according to a Pew Research Center report released Thursday.

While volunteering at her daughter's school, Rachel Gregersen noticed something that bothered her.

Her 8-year-old daughter was the only African-American she saw in her class."I was seeing the world through her eyes for the first time," Gregersen said.

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Examined in isolation the data point that one in six U. newlyweds are now married to someone of a different race, appears quite astounding.

We’re going to lose millions of dollars on this film,’” Houghton told the Associated Press in an article celebrating the 50th anniversary of the historic film. The movie made more money for Columbia than any film before it, earned 10 Oscar nominations — winning two — and landed among the 100 greatest movies selected by the American Film Institute.

The film, with its radical-for-its-time interracial romance, marked the first time a White actress and a Black actor kissed in a major motion picture.

The Chicago metropolitan area's rate of interracial marriages is 19 percent, slightly higher than the national rate of 16 percent, according to the study. Almost one-third of married Asian-Americans and about a quarter of married Hispanics are married to a person of a different race or gender, according to the study.

When Rachel Gregersen gets asked for identification at the same store where her husband does not, or when they eat out together and the waiter asks if they want separate checks, she said, they notice it.

This June 12 marks the 50th anniversary of Latinos and Asians are the most likely groups to intermarry in the U. S.-born Hispanic newlyweds and 46 percent of Asian newlyweds marrying a spouse of a different race or ethnicity.

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