Data dating violence

6854933580_2c8b688306_z

Males make up a significant proportion of victims of family and sexual violence, yet are excluded from government anti-violence programs such as Contrary to common beliefs, up to One in Three victims of sexual assault* and at least One in Three victims of family violence and abuse is male (perhaps as many as one in two).

When reading the following quantitative statistics it should be remembered that family violence is extremely complex and doesn't just boil down to ‘who does what to whom and how badly’.

There was no statistically significant difference between fathers and mothers in the frequency of reporting having often felt fearful after experiencing physical violence or emotional abuse since separation, and fathers were statistically significantly more likely than mothers to report having often felt controlled or coerced after experiencing physical violence or emotional abuse since separation.

When it came to severity, fathers were also more likely than mothers to report experiencing the highest level of fear, control and coersion (10 on a 10-point scale) that they felt arising from the focus parent’s behaviour since separation.

However, generally, anything that is excited in an injurious or damaging way may be described as violent even if not meant to be violence (by a person and against a person).

Violence against women is now recognised to be a serious and widespread problem in Australia with enormous individual and community impacts and social costs1.

(2015) Violence against women: Additional analysis of the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Personal Safety Survey 2012, Horizons Research Report, Issue 1, Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS), Sydney; and Woodlock, D., Healey, L., Howe, K., Mc Guire, M., Geddes, V. (2014) Voices against violence paper one: Summary report and recommendations, Women with Disabilities Victoria, Office of the Public Advocate and Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria. 1-6; Statistics Canada (2003) Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile 2003, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Ministry of Justice, Canada. National Crime Prevention (2001) Young people and domestic violence: National research on young people’s attitudes and experiences of domestic violence, Crime Prevention Branch, Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department, Canberra; and Cox (2015), see note 2.

(2015) Everyday sexism: Australian women’s experiences of street harassment, The Australia Institute, Canberra.

In the 2012 Personal Safety Survey, 13% of women in this age group reported having experienced violence by a man in the last 12 months.

Research Findings on Violence Against Men A Power Point presentation with graphics on violence against men.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!